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What I did on my . . . sabbatical(?)

Is it a sabbatical if you don’t work in academia? Well, I spent three weeks away from home focusing on surface design, and I got to sell some fabric too. That seems to parallel the idea of a break from the normal routine to take time to study. I’ve taken single week classes before, but never longer. I wish I could say it was an instant-gratification, earth-shattering, life-changing experience, but life doesn’t work that way. This was certainly gratifying, but any change will have to come from within, which, like thinking, is hard. Whaaaa. 🙂
Using this sticky keyboard is a pain, too, so let me see what pictures I can find.

Twenty-four monoprints in one day!!

Critique of ‘Impaired’

Lovely fungus – need to make printed fabric in these colors

First stage of a monoprint, worth repeating

View from the B&B where we spent three nights. At dawn. I don’t do dawn.
This is where we spent the remaining eighteen nights. Much more affordable. Plus we visited my sister on the way out and back. Great way to break up the trip – thanks!
Very grateful to have the opportunity to attend, to be able to sell fabric and dye tools & toys to be able to afford to attend, and support from family to encourage me to attend!

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3-2-1 Blastoff newsletter readers

[Skip to the last paragraph to read the most important bits.]
Yesterday, in addition to my last post here on the blog, I also got a newsletter out. This morning I checked the report from MailChimp on my phone. I’m incredibly bad about checking the “metrics” and today I just happened to click on the ‘opened’ link and scrolled through the 165 people who had opened it as of 8:30 AM. (Now 11 hours later and it’s up to 198, or 41%, with 23 clicks.)
There was one unsubscribe, and that’s OK. The reason was a sad one – that person, who has opened every single newsletter I’ve ever sent – now has an illness that prevents her from using a computer. My heart goes out to her and the caregiver who wrote an explanation when she unsubscribed.
The rest of the list of names was a real trip down memory lane. Some people were family – I’m grateful they look even though dyeing and quilting isn’t their thing. I saw names of a couple of my dye teachers and many fellow students, my students, customers and custom-work clients. There were people I met when I worked in the local quilt shop, and many people I’ve met at shows over the years. And below is the current geographic data of where people were when they opened the newsletter. Anyway, I expect this is really kind of dull to most readers. But . . .
The Last Paragraph – what I’m trying to get at with this post is how truly grateful I am to everyone who takes the time to read the newsletter, and who has touched my life and has let me into theirs as well. Thank you, so very much.

Top locations by opens

  • USA
    288 94.1%
  • Canada
    7 2.3%
  • Australia
    6 2.0%
  • United Kingdom
    4 1.3%
  • Israel
    1 0.3%